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falderal : a moving images blog

Archive for June, 2012

From Low Art to High Art: Film’s Availability to the Masses

Monday, June 4th, 2012

This is a ramble. Feel free to ignore.

The correlation between art and economics has always been present and the thought of art being “hoity-toity” even now is proof of this. Anything considered as something “above” is tied in with wealth — people assume that going to museums is for people who are wealthy and educated even though nothing about art itself is inherently tied to wealth.
In the Western world, art has slowly moved from being something private to something more public and for the masses. Paintings were usually for private use although statues and murals were for the public, but with the rise of prints, the availability of something grew. People were able to afford these non-originals and these prints were easily produced and distributed. I believe that films bring this to the next level. People in the beginning were suspicious of films and it was seen as a lower form of art. Yet with the rise of new technology, is film going towards a direction that is no longer for the masses? With the rising ticket prices, films are becoming something more exclusive. If one does not have the monetary means of being able to pay for a ticket, they cannot experience certain films the way they were supposed to be experienced. It is no surprise that people turn to pirating to get their “fix”. Back in the 30s during the Depression, Americans still flocked to the theatres to escape and to find shelter and amusement for a cheap price. Now the last thing people think about is spending their money on movies and if they do, they would probably want more bang for their buck and buy a DVD, which they can watch repeatedly.
It’s funny how the film medium, which has started as something quite egalitarian, has turned into something that is no longer that. What will films be like in the future and what will their place be in our lives? Will the movie going experience slowly die down or will gimmicks (most likely quite expensive) draw the audiences back in? i